Pupils will become exactly what the illuminati want—dumbed-down robots who do their bidding. By distorting your creative capabilities, you essentially become robotic, thus under the control of the Illuminati. A mind that is positive cannot be controlled. For the purposes of occult dominion minds must therefore be rendered passive and negative in order that control can be achieved.

Unfortunately, the nature of modern life and the mechanisms that we have developed to cope with its complexity make it easy for us to lose sight of the meanings that surround us. In our modern, complex civilization it is easy to enter into what Wilson calls ‘robotic consciousness’.

Pupils will become exactly what the illuminati want—dumbed-down robots who do their bidding.

By distorting your creative capabilities, you essentially become robotic, thus under the control of the Illuminati.

One good example is the withholding of free energy technology that could not only eliminate pollution of the planet but also free up the drain on destroying Earth’s natural resources. Such free energy technology has been known for thousands of years.

You could have a fuel cell located behind your house that could supply all the electrical energy you needed for a lifetime, free of charge. The availability of free energy technology is a proven spiritual and scientific fact. When will humanity rise up and demand control of their lives on Earth?

The ‘robot’ is Wilson’s name for that part of us that learns how to do certain activities automatically. It takes a lot of effort, for example, to learn to ride a bicycle, but once learnt controlling the bicycle becomes automatic.

We no longer have to pay conscious attention to the task of staying upright. Our ‘robot’ does that for us. In our complex world having a ‘robot’ makes it possible for us to cope as the ‘robot’ deals with many mundane tasks.

The ‘robot’ is a wonderful, labour-saving device, but it needs to know its place. Unfortunately, as well as taking much of the drudgery out of life, it has the potential to take much of the joy out of it as well.

By allowing us to do many tasks without much conscious awareness, it frees the conscious mind to think about other things.

But without challenge, the conscious mind can easily become bored and passive.

As many of the tasks we perform have been made automatic, we make fewer efforts and life appears to us as boring and meaningless. If this continues for some time, we are in danger of entering that state that Wilson calls ‘life failure’.

It is true that the right brain is the source of our sense of meaning.

Left-brain-dominant consciousness reveals a world without meaning; right-brain-dominant consciousness reveals a world overflowing with meaning but inhibits our capacity to organize it.

The answer, it seems, is to have both brains work together. This is Faculty X. When the right brain supplies the meaning, then the facts of our existence take on a remarkable character. It is then that, like Proust, Hesse, and Eliot, we feel we are remembering something that we already know, but now really know.

Faculty X is not a nostalgia for “times past” but an unrecognized power we have of knowing the world, almost like a sixth sense. And according to Wilson, it is a sense we can develop.

The first step in developing our capacity for Faculty X, then, is to create a sense of optimism—not about anything in particular, but a general sense that life means well by us, what Jean Gebser called “primal trust.” And this leads naturally to the next step, developing a sense of purpose. After we stop sending our right brain messages of doom, the next step is to foster a sense of interest.

The robotized mind has no meaning and don´t need to be positive.

A mind that is positive cannot be controlled. For the purposes of occult dominion minds must therefore be rendered passive and negative in order that control can be achieved. Minds consciously working to a definite end are a power, and power can oppose power for good or for evil. The scheme for world dominion might be doomed by the recognition of this principle alone, but, as it is unfortunately unrecognized, it remains unchallenged.

Since the Illuminati is a religious group which believes that they hold the divine right to rule the earth.

Our sense of insignificance is rooted in the feeling that we can’t win, that the forces working upon us are too strong. This leads us to abnegate our will, to give up. When we do this, our sense of insignificance increases. It should be clear that this is a very dangerous vicious circle; Wilson would later argue that it is the basic cause of mental breakdown.

The truth is, you are not a robot or a puppet, you can help it, but you must be delivered from a passive mind in that area.

He proposes that ‘psychologically . . . we consist of three major components: the left-brain, the right-brain, and the “robot”.’ He feels that the robot is probably located in the cerebellum—the small, posterior part of the brain.” The ‘robot’ is a major obstacle to expanded perception. In defining this concept, one example Wilson gives is that of learning to drive. At first, it is necessary for the learner to think consciously about such operations as steering, changing gear, and braking; after a time, he finds himself performing all these operations without having to think consciously about them. A `robot’ has taken over. Wilson comments:

This robot is a labour-saving device. . . . When an activity has been performed often enough, he takes it over, and what is more, he does it a great deal more efficiently than I could do it consciously. . . . [But the robot] has taken over too many of our functions.”

The ‘robot’ may, for example, take over when we listen to music or make love, and then these activities will fail to produce expanded perception. Fresh external stimuli—a new L.P. or mistress, for instance—may temporarily put the `robot’ out of action; but this is only a short-term expedient. In defeating the robot, Wilson stresses the importance of the will. He distinguishes between two kinds of will: the kind which can be ineffective or counter-productive, as we may will in vain to stop worrying, or with the result that we worry more; and the truly potent will. In Wilson’s model of brain physiology, the first kind of will would be due to the left brain working without sufficient support from the right, while the second kind would be due to the left and right brains working in combination.

Mystics and poets tell us that we live in a fascinating universe, a cosmos of such complexity that it seems unthinkable anyone could be bored in it. Yet this is exactly what happens.

Our whole obsession with youth is based on the idea that, after a certain age, life loses its appeal and we spend the rest of our days doing “the same old thing.” But when we look at creative individuals, like the playwright Bernard Shaw, who continued working into his nineties, and the poet W. B. Yeats, who threw off his youthful pessimism and grew into a giant of world literature in his later years, we see that modern culture’s emphasis on the emptiness of life is an enormous mistake, based on a complete misunderstanding about the nature of consciousness.

The only way to prove this, of course, is to actually develop our capacity for Faculty X, which really means developing our power to grasp reality.

Once he has a clear idea of what he wants to do, he seems to be unconquerable. His problem has never been will-power, but imagination: to know what he ought to turn his will towards.

And this constitutes the greatest cause for optimism at this point in history — Nostradamus and Edgar Cayce notwithstanding. Evolution proceeds in leaps, and man has now reached the interesting point where he is prepared to understand it consciously, and move forward with a full understanding of what he is doing.

Our trouble in the past has been poor communication between intelligence and instinct, which has meant that the intelligent people lacked power and vitality, while the instinctive people lacked vision and long-distance purpose. Intelligence and instinct can be united by the development of Faculty X. Once man understands this, nothing can hold him back.

Our trouble in the past has been poor communication between intelligence and instinct, which has meant that the intelligent people lacked power and vitality, while the instinctive people lacked vision and long-distance purpose. Intelligence and instinct can be united by the development of Faculty X. Once man understands this, nothing can hold him back.

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